Norman Lear Classics ‘All In The Family,’ ‘The Jeffersons,’ ‘Good Times’ And ‘Maude’ Up For Reboots

According to EW, Norman Lear is all set to make a comeback. The sitcom legend has signed a 2-year deal with Sony Pictures TV. Thi deal will offer him to stage reboot his all-time CBS classics like “All in The Family”, “Good Times”, “The Jeffersons”, and “Maude”.

The 96-year-old is never too late to make a comeback. Sony Pictures TV has already worked with the production company of Lear’s Act III and has authoritative rights to The Norman Lear Library. Lear’s pilot for his movie “Guess Who Died” was also developed by Act III. But according to EW, the project did not proceed at NBC. The cast of the movie contains Adrian Martinez, Hector Elizondo, Beth Lacke, and Holland Taylor.

A 2-year deal has been signed between Norman Lear and Sony Pictures TV.

After signing the contract with Norman Lear, a joint statement was released by Jeff Frost – the president of Sony Pictures TV – Jason Clodfelter, Chris Parnell – the co-presidents of the TV. They said that they are very happy to expand their relationship with Norman and Brent. They further said that working with Norman is a dream come true and he is a legend of the industry. The presidential group further said that they are ready to create more magic with Brent and Norman.

While commenting on his contract signing, four-time Grammy winner said that he could not prouder and he really appreciates Sony Picture TV who has guts to work with a child. According to Variety, Sony Pictures TV also have rights of Norman’s show. Norman Lear was awarded four times with Grammy for “All In The Family “. His other major credits include “Sanford and Son”, “The Jeffersons”, “Marty Hartman”, “Good Times”. and “Mary Hartman”. Back in 1967, he was also nominated for Oscar for his co-writing of “Divorce American Style”.

In 2017, The new One Day at a Time” was launched and it received much appreciation all over the world. The series was created by Mike Royce and Calderon Kellett. Justina Machado played the main role in the series and played the character of a divorced Cuban-American.

The show was credited as “a guiding light” by the National Hispanic Media Coalition and after that Netflix renewed the season for the third time. “One Day At A Time” was the series of Norman which was released with the same name back in 1975-1984. The only reason that its 2017 reboot much fame is that it tackled the main issues of the series.

Many people don’t know but he is also the founder of “People For the American Way” and therefore well-recognized for his passion for women’s rights, social change, and humanitarian efforts. In recent months, television series of the 20th century have been revitalized as series like “Samurai Jack” and “Twin Peaks” have made their appearance again on the big screen.

One of the high-profiles return that has recently happened is “Roseanne”. The series of ABC has gathered a big audience and that too for all the wrong reasons. According to reports, in coming months there will be more revivals in the likes of “Magnum P.I.”, “Charmed”, and “Cagney and Lacey”.

“The Jeffersons” is one of the best TV show ever produced in the history.

Norman Lear made his debut in 1971 with sitcom’s “All in the Family”. The story of the series revolves around the character of “Archie Bunker” which is still considered as one of the greatest characters of the TV series.

And the series is one of the most popular TV series of all time. Other than these shows, there are many famous shows in the catalog of Lear including “Good Times”, and “Sanford and Son”. Now Sony Pictures TV also has a chance to reboot two of the most beloved TV series of all time  – “The Jeffersons” and “All in the Family”. The fame of these two shows can be estimated with the fact that any reboot of these two may create a major backlash.

Rebooting the classic shows of Lear in modern industry would be a great exercise. After the success of “One Day at a Time” reboot, there are chances that Sony Pictures TV will also make an attempt to revitalize Norman’s two classic TV shows – “The Jefferson” and “All in the Family.”